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JAPANESE BASEBALL

 

OUR MOST POPULAR JAPANESE LEAGUE BASEBALL PACKAGES

 

 

HERE THEY ARE TO MAKE YOU GREAT PROFITS!     

To sum up how Bob Akmens has done in baseball for the 30+ years he’s run America’s premier sports service, we’ll quote the famous line of Chico Escuela, late of “Saturday Night Live”:

“Besball beeen berry, berry good to me! ”

Over the years we’ve been in business, we’re proud to say that we have finished in first-place in more different categories of documented monitoring contests in baseball – more #1-titles in baseball - than any service ever - dead or alive.  You'll find an updated total of #1-titles further down this page.

And we’d also like to remind everyone that we won the prestigious The Sports Monitor MLB contest in 2007 in 6 different categories including MOST NET PROFIT WON & we hit about 70% of our totals.  And that we won The Titanium Award bestowed by The Sports Eye for most bankroll won in the entire MLB season.

Maybe we’re proudest of the fact that we have the unique distinction of having won the very first handicapping contest ever for sports services in baseball in 1980 – and we won the very last contest in 2008, the MLB Post-Season Championship at the Las Vegas Sports Monitor in both categories (net units [profit] and win-percentage) - with many titles in between!

WE'RE THE DEFENDING BASEBALL HANDICAPPING CHAMPS AT THE LAS VEGAS SPORTS MONITOR!

We have baseball packages for everyone!  Whether you like Major League Baseball - or like Japanese Baseball - or Korean Baseball - or Mexican League Baseball - or like all of these things - we guarantee you'll find what you're looking for at Bob Akmens Sports.

We’ll also indicate our most popular packages so you can make a quick decision if you'd like.

 Section

Japanese Baseball generally parallels MLB, playing from April into October, and we'll have plenty of winners - so enjoy!

But let’s now take a look our 3 most popular Japanese Baseball packages – each has many subscribers who come back to them year-after-year-after-year.  And we hope you’ll be one of those folks!

Just please read the description of what's offered in the package carefully to help you choose the right one for you.

AN IMPORTANT NOTE - PLEASE READ:

We never "create" a play for the sake of having one.  You’ll only get plays that we think are worth betting.  This means some days we won't have a play in a given sport. We’ll inform you of that if you have a longer- term package - and naturally, if you buy a 1-day deal and we have nothing that day, you'll get the next available plays.

ALSO - PLEASE READ - WE HAVE A CUT-OFF TIME FOR PAYMENTS RECEIVED:

We'll try to get your plays to you as soon as is possible by email.  If PayPal notifies us before about 6:30 PM Eastern time on a weekday, or by about 1 PM Eastern time on a weekend day, we'll try to get that day's plays to you before they start. If payment notification gets to us after these times, your service generally will start with the next available plays. 

 


 

 

 


 

 IF YOU'RE LIKE MOST OF OUR CLIENTS, YOU'RE INTERESTED IN WINNING AT JAPANESE BASEBALL

SO, RIGHT OFF THE BAT, LET’S SHOW YOU OUR SINGLE MOST-POPULAR JAPANESE BASEBALL PACKAGE:

 

 

 

AND NOW, LET’S LOOK AT THE 2 SHORTER-TERM ALL-INCLUSIVE JAPANESE BASEBALL PACKAGES – THE WEEKLY & THE 4-WEEK ONES:

BASEBALL PACKAGES: NAME & ITEM CODE PRICE DESCRIPTION  

FULL SEASON OF ALL JAPANESE BASEBALL

(BAS-JPBB-ALL-SEA)

You will get your plays by an emailed report -

or you can call us

$1095 (ALL SIDES & TOTALS)

Daily cost = just $5+/day

BEST rate - NEW - LOWEST rate EVER!
 
BASEBALL PACKAGES: NAME & ITEM CODE PRICE DESCRIPTION  

7 DAYS OF ALL JAPANESE BASEBALL

(BAS-JPBB-ALL-7)

You will get your plays by an emailed report -

or you can call us

$119 (ALL SIDES & TOTALS)

Daily cost = just $11+/day

GOOD rate - NEW - LOWEST rate EVER!
 

28 DAYS OF ALL JAPANESE BASEBALL

(BAS-JPBB-ALL-28)

You will get your plays by an emailed report -

or you can call us

$357 (ALL SIDES & TOTALS)

Daily cost = just $8+/day

BETTER rate - NEW - LOWEST rate EVER!

 

 

JAPANESE BASEBALL:  USEFUL LINKS

 

 JapaneseBaseball.com  News, standings, and statistics for the Pacific and Central Leagues.
Category: Baseball > Japan
 Japan Baseball Daily  Daily game and team reports and analysis for Japanese pro baseball. Includes stats  
for retired players, season leaders, award winners, and links to Japanese baseball  
links.
Category: Baseball > Japan
 Baseball Japan This blog will be absolutely brimming with Japanese baseball posts in the near  
future. ... NPB, MLB, Amateur baseball, and more.
 East Windup Chronicle Japanese baseball coverage in English
 japan-guide.com: Baseball Offers general information and links.
Category: Baseball > Japan
 JapanBall.com Guide to Japanese baseball. Updated news, scores, standings, and stats, plus tour 
details.
Category: Baseball > Japan
 Sports News: Japanese Baseball The latest Japanese baseball news, scores, standings, statistics and commentaries
 Jim Allen's Japanese Baseball Page Includes history and differences between the baseball in Japan and the U.S. by an  
editor of the Daily Yomiuri.
Category: Baseball > Japan
 Baseball Guru Daily Japanese baseball game summaries and data archive.
Category: Baseball > Japan
 BASEBALL-LINKS.COM: International: Japan Skilton's Baseball Links is the World Wide Web's most comprehensive collection of links to baseball

 

 

 

Sports Betting at the
Sportsbook

 

JAPANESE BASEBALL:  A HISTORY

 

Baseball in Japan

The sport of baseball was introduced to Japan in 1872 by Horace Wilson, and the first formal team was established in 1878. It has been a popular sport ever since. It is called yakyu in Japanese, combining the characters for field and ball.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] History

Two Waseda University baseball players in 1921.

Hiroshi Hiraoka, who was in United States studying engineering, introduced the game to his co-workers at Japan’s national railways in 1878. He and his co-workers created the first baseball team, the Shimbashi Athletic Club, and dominated other teams which popped up in Japan. However it wasn’t until the team from Tokyo University started playing that the sport took hold in Japanese culture. In 1896 the team defeated an American team from the Yokohama Country and Athletic Club 29 to 4. It was the first recorded international baseball game in Asia. After that victory, several other universities in Japan adopted the sport and it quickly spread throughout Japan. Since then teams from Japan have travelled to learn from their American counterparts. Waseda University was one of the first teams to cross the ocean to improve their skills. In 1905 the team traveled to the United States where it played college teams from around the country. Other universities in Japan made similar trips, and U.S. teams travelled to Japan to play.

In 1913 and in 1922, American baseball stars visited Japan and played against university teams. They also held clinics on technique. Herb Hunter, a retired major league player, made eight trips to Japan from 1922 to 1932 to organize games and coaching clinics.

Baseball is also played in Japan's junior and senior high schools. Each year in March and August, two tournaments are held at Koshien Stadium for senior high school teams that win a prefecture tournament.

[edit] Baseball in Japan

The professional baseball association is called Nippon Professional Baseball. Japan has two leagues, as in the United States. The Central and Pacific Leagues both consist of six teams each. The Pacific League uses the designated hitter style of play. The pro baseball season is eight months long. Games begin in April, with a Championship held in October. Teams play 135 games, considerably fewer than the 162 games of the American major league teams.

Corporations own all the teams in Japan. Team names come from the owners, not where the team is based. Nippon Professional Baseball is the highest level of professional baseball in Japan.

[edit] Differences with the American leagues

The rules are essentially those of Major League Baseball. In the Nippon league, however, tie games are allowed, and technical elements are slightly different: a smaller baseball, strike zone, and playing field are used. The Japanese baseball is wound more tightly and is harder than an American baseball. The strike zone is narrower "inside" than away from the batter. Also, five Nippon league teams have undersized home fields. A controversial rule also allows a team to have no more than four foreign players, limiting the cost and competition for expensive players from other countries.

[edit] Professional baseball

Nippon Professional Baseball started in 1920. It is called Puro Yakyu (????), which simply is a translation of professional baseball.

In 2005 the Japan Samurai Bears began playing in the Golden Baseball League, the first Japanese team in an American professional baseball league.

[edit] The Strike of 2004

On September 18 and 19, 2004, the professional Japanese players struck for the first time in over seventy years. The strike was caused by the Nippon League's threat to merge two teams to create more revenue. The strike ended when the Nippon League abandoned the proposed merger.

The Japanese first professional league was formed in 1936, and by 1950 had grown big enough to divide into two leagues. The Central League included the established teams; the Pacific League, which made up of new teams and players. Both leagues had 6 teams and adopted a playoff system, much like the American one. The contest between the league winners was named the Japan Series.

In September 2004, the owners and the Nippon Professional Baseball League (NPB) met to discuss the merger of two teams. Prior to this, the JPBPA had decided to strike on weekends for the remainder of September. They held talks with the owners and with the JPB. on consecutive days. The owners offered to help the players. They would reduce the “entry fee” to join the league; they guaranteed that the Chiba Lotte Marines and the Fukuoka Daiei Hawks, both of the Pacific League, and the two leagues would remain; the Central League would have six teams, and the Pacific League would have five. They also put the merger of the Buffaloes and Blue Wave on hold.

The players decided to strike, as there was insufficient time left in the season to hold discussions. The fans supported the players, which made the owners review the idea of finding another team for the following season.

On September 23, 2004, the players and owners reached an agreement. The Tohuku Rakuten Eagles would enter the league at the beginning of the 2005 season, and the leagues would adopt interleague play, which would make the game more appealing and help the Pacific League gain exposure by playing the more popular Central league teams. In December 2004, Softbank Corporation, an internet service provider, purchased the Fukuoka Daiei Hawks to help with finances in the Pacific League.

[edit] High school baseball

[edit] Amateur baseball

Amateur baseball leagues exist all over Japan, with many teams sponsored by companies. Amateur baseball is governed by the Japan Amateur Baseball Association (JABA).

[edit] In popular culture

Several manga have baseball as their subject, including Touch and Major.

[edit] References

http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20080129&content_id=2359029&vkey=news_mlb&fext=.jsp&c_id=mlb

International Journal of Employment Studies 14.2 (Oct 2006): p19(17). (5318 words)

http://www.baywell.ne.jp/users/drlatham/baseball/news/essays/japanbb.htm

http://www.reference.com/search?q=japanese%20baseball


Ofra Bikel, Gail Harris, Judy Woodruff, et al., American Game, Japanese Rules (Alexandria, Va.: PBS Video, 1990).

Richard C. Crepeau, "Pearl Harbor: A Failure of Baseball?," The Journal of Popular Culture xv.4 (1982): 67-74.

Warren Cromartie Robert Whiting, Slugging It out in Japan: An American Major Leaguer in the Tokyo Outfield (New York: Signet, 1992).

Charles W. Hayford, "Japanese Baseball or Baseball in Japan?," Japan Focus (April 4 2007): [1]. Reprinted: "Samurai Baseball: Off Base or Safe At Home?" Frog in a Well (April 10, 2007) [2].

William Kelly, "Blood and Guts in Japanese Professional Baseball," in Sepp Linhard and Sabine Frustuck, ed., The Culture of Japan as Seen through Its Leisure (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1998): 95-111.

William Kelly, "Caught in the Spin Cycle: An Anthropological Observer at the Sites of Japanese Professional Baseball," in Susan O. Long, ed., Moving Targets: Ethnographies of Self and Community in Japan. (Ithaca, 2000)

William Kelly, "The Spirit and Spectacle of School Baseball: Mass Media, Statemaking, and 'Edu-Tainment' in Japan, 1905-1935," in William Kelly Umesao Tadao, and Kubo Masatoshi, ed., Japanese Civilization in the Modern World Xiv: Information and Communication (Osaka: National Museum of Ethnology, 2000): 105-116.

William W. Kelly, Fanning the Flames: Fans and Consumer Culture in Contemporary Japan (Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 2004).

William Kelly, "Is Baseball a Global Sport? America's 'National Pastime' as a Global Sport," Global Networks 7.2 (2007):

Donald Roden, "Baseball and the Quest for National Dignity in Meiji Japan," The American Historical Review 85.3 (1980): 534.

Robert Whiting, The Chrysanthemum and the Bat: Baseball Samurai Style (New York: Dodd, Mead, 1977).

Robert Whiting, You Gotta Have Wa: When Two Cultures Collide on the Baseball Diamond (New York: Vintage Books, Vintage departures, 1990).

Robert Whiting, "The Japanese Way of Baseball and the National Character Debate," Japan Focus (September 29 2006):

Robert Whiting, "The Japanese Way of Baseball and the National Character Debate," Studies on Asia Series III 3 (Fall 2006): [3]

Donald Roden, "baseball and the quest for national dignity in Meiji Japan"

[edit] External links

Source: Wikipedia

 

 

 

 

JAPANESE BASEBALL:  MORE BACKGROUND

 

Japanese Baseball

Japan

This is how baseball is played in the land of the rising sun.

 

First off, lets talk about this little island chain. It is a little smaller size-wise than California, however 127 million citizens call it home. Politically, they like to kick it old-school with a constitutional monarchy with a little parliamentary government thrown in for good measure.

Japan is most known for disciplined ballplayers with uncanny abilities (okay, lets just call it Ichiro Suzuki); civil engineering marvels, Shinkansen bullet trains that whip under the ocean between Japan’s islands; Mount Fuji; subways so packed officers actually push crowds in like sardines during peak hours; of course, awesome sunrises.

Ichiro Suzuki

The game of baseball was introduced in 1872 by Horace Wilson, an American professor of English at Tokyo University. All of Japan is a baseball hot spot, but particularly in and around the big cities such as Tokyo, Osaka, Yokohama and Nagoya, among others.

The first Japanese born player to play in MLB was Masanori Murakami, born in Otsuki, he pitched for the San Francisco Giants in 1964. Most notable MLB exports include Hideo Nomo (first to leave voluntarily, in 1995); Hideki Matsui; Kazuo Matsui; Ichiro Suzuki (Mariners). Suzuki broke George Sisler’s single-season MLB hit record (257) in 2004, finishing with 262 hits. Right-hander Kazuhiro Sasaki pitched four seasons for the Seattle Mariners (2000-2003), recording 45 saves in 2001 and was set up by his countryman Shigetoshi Hasegawa.

Sadaharu Oh remains the greatest Japanese player, hitting 868 home runs during his 22-year career in the 1960s and 1970s. Born in Tokyo to a Chinese-born father and Japanese-born mother, “Oh” means “King” in Chinese. Oh is manager of the Fukuoka Daiei Hawks where he has led the team to three pennants and one Japan Series title.

Sadaharu Oh

I have covered recent Japanese export in another article, Daisuke Matsuzaka so I recommend you check that out. Kman has Yankees’ lefthander Kei Igawa and Akinori Iwamura covered.

High School/Amateur Baseball

More than 4,000 high school teams take part in regional qualifiers for the country’s two big high school tournaments. Japan’s national high school and industrial league tournaments draw the attention of Major League Baseball scouts; the most prestigious college conference in Japan is the Roku-daigaku (Big Six) league. But high school tourneys take the cake — it’s huge in Japan. Even qualifying high school tournaments are often televised locally.

There are two national high school tournaments annually with the finals taking place at historic Hanshin Koshien Stadium in Osaka, and each of those games is televised nationally. How huge? If any tournament games of the national event in August need to be rescheduled because of inclement weather, the professional team, the Hanshin Tigers, has to postpone or cancel conflicting home games. What’s more, a more than 50-year-old tradition exists where each player on the losing team in the championship game takes home a pouch of Koshien’s dirt. The postgame ceremonies are Japan’s version of a cross between the Academy Awards red carpet and the Presidential inauguration, with both the winning and losing teams receiving medals while traditional Japanese music plays in the ballpark and fans stand in recognition. (Losing) players are crying and both teams’ players bow to each other in Japanese ritual. The champions speak to the crowd and many break down crying — in joy. “Koshien” means high school in Japan and the ballpark — which has hosted Babe Ruth — was built to service the tournaments.

Japan also has a competitive college program, which dates back more than 100 years. One of the biggest rivalries is Waseda University and Keio, a rivalry that dates back to 1903. It got so nasty in 1906 that games were cancelled for a while due to fan rowdiness.

Nippon (Japan) Professional Baseball League

Founded in 1936, today 12 teams, split among two leagues, each play about 135 regular season games from April-October. Traditionally, the team with the best record from the Central League (older league; pitcher hits) and Pacific League (younger league; employs designated hitter) met in a best-of-seven Japan Series. In 2004, the Pacific League played five fewer games than the Central League teams during the regular season and used a new playoff format to determine its champion. The teams in third and second place played in a best-of-three series (all at the second place team’s ballpark) with the winner going on to play the first-place team in a best-of-five series at its home ballpark. Each team can have four foreign-born players on its active roster at any one time (often, two position players and two pitchers). The majority of these foreign-born players are U.S. born; however, they also come from Latin America and other parts of Asia, namely South Korea and Taiwan. Typically, most foreign-born players sign a one-year contract, with an option for a second year.

The teams are: Tokyo’s world famous Yomiuri Giants; Tokyo’s Yakult Swallows; (East) Tokyo’s Chiba Lotte Marines; (West) Tokyo’s Seibu Lions; Yokohama’s BayStars; Nagoya’s Chunichi Dragons; Osaka’s Hanshin Tigers; Osaka’s Orix Buffaloes; Hiroshima’s Carp; Fukuoka’s Daiei Hawks; Sendai’s Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles and Sapporo’s Hokkaido Nippon Ham Fighters. The Yomiuri Giants, Japan’s oldest professional team, have won 20 championships.

Good luck getting a ticket to see a Giants game — they annually draw more than 3.5 million. As two of the oldest franchises from two of Japan’s most historic cities, the Tokyo-based Giants and Hanshin Tigers of Osaka have the strongest rivalry.

Foreign-born players usually come and go after a year or two, but Tuffy Rhodes is among the success stories. The former Chicago Cub has been among Japan’s top home run hitters since 2001, as has Venezuelan Alex Cabrera (once property of the Arizona Diamondbacks). A more notable name in Japan is former big league manager Bobby Valentine who, in 2005, guided the Chiba Lotte Marines to the championship.

Tuffy Rhodes

This is just out of control:

The average one-year salary for foreign players is roughly $400,000 to $600,000. Teams often sign major league veterans to $1 million contracts, but players who only have minor league experience earn considerably less, usually around $150,000 to $300,000, which can be more than the average minor league contract.

Free Agent Policy

Japanese-born players cannot become free agents until they have completed 10 seasons. These Japanese-born players must wait nine seasons, and in most cases 10, before they can leave Japan and sign with a major league baseball team. After nine seasons, a Japanese-born player is eligible to be posted by his Japanese team to the highest-bidding major league club. The major league team with the highest bid gains exclusive negotiating rights for 30 days to sign the player to a contract. Ichiro Suzuki joined MLB through the posting system (The Mariners paid the Orix Blue Wave, now Orix Buffaloes, $13 million for the right to sign Ichiro). Hideki Matsui had 10 years of experience with the Yomiuri Giants when he signed with the Yankees, having reached free agency. Known as “Godzilla,” Matsui hit 332 career home runs for the Giants, including 50 homers in 2002 to lead the Giants to the Japan Series title. Most Japanese teams have a relationship with at least one MLB franchise where they share player development and coaching expertise. These relationships also come in handy during player negotiations.

Ballparks

It’s not the prettiest, nor does it employ much of the modern amenities found in the major leagues, but clearly, Japan’s most historic ballpark is Hanshin Koshien Stadium in Osaka. Opening in 1924 and heavily influenced by the Polo Grounds in New York City, the ballpark was built to house Japan’s historic national high school baseball tournaments (”Koshien” means high school baseball in Japan). In 1924, it was the largest stadium on the continent at the time, with a capacity of 53,000, and by 1934, hosted Babe Ruth during an exhibition game.

Hanshin Koshien Stadium

The aisles are even narrower than Fenway Park, but the playing surface at Koshien is dirt, as is another favorite Japanese ballpark, Hiroshima Stadium, which opened in 1957. The remnants of the Atomic Bomb are just across the street from the ballpark — and they are as in-your-face as in-your-face can be. Meiji Jingu Stadium, Yokohama Stadium and Skymark Stadium (formerly Green Stadium), the only grass infield, are also great throwback ballparks. Green Stadium has a small marker, honoring Ichiro, in the main concourse beyond the right field fence. Because there’s very little open space in Japan, ballparks and ball fields have some unusual neighbors. You can have a pregame catch on the beach behind Chiba Lotte Stadium, and players on the Swallows practice across the street from the ballpark in a Tokyo park. Among modern, domed ballparks, the most notable is the Tokyo Dome, which debuted in 1988 and holds 55,000. Known as “The Big Egg” for its marshmallow-like, white Teflon roof, it’s somewhat similar to the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome, home of the Minnesota Twins.

Hiroshima Stadium

Meiji Jingu Stadium

Chiba Lotte Stadium

Tokyo Dome
Not only can you bring food into the ballpark, you can also order plenty of Western grub, and there’s plenty of great Japanese fare to be had with chopsticks in hand, including ramen, soba, sake, udon, yakitori, noodles and curry rice. Try onigiri — rice balls wrapped in seaweed — or shabu shabu — little strips of meat prepared in boiling water with vegetables. And “Keg Me!” Cute Japanese women roam the aisleways with mini-kegs on their back pouring beer suds.

Onigiri

Be prepared to leave the ballpark humming a few new tunes. Even when there’s a sparse crowd, the bands play and their beats — a different one for each player — will be ringing in your head for the following 24 hours. Really want to get in the game? Buy a balloon, blow into it and then let the air out of the sucker after the top of the seventh. Yeah, air balloon time in Japan equals the 7th inning stretch in North America.

Since 1986, the best players in Nippon Professional Baseball have hosted a team of among the best MLB players every other November, except for the strike-interrupted 1994 season. Both All-Star teams consist of 28 players. MLB and the MLBPA (players association) select the All-Star team and staff, including managers and coaches. In Japan, one player at each position is selected through fan balloting while the manager selects the remaining team members.

The All-Star Series usually takes place for about 10 days in early-to-mid November, with all games played at a variety of domed-ballparks throughout Japan. All games end in the ninth inning, regardless of the score, and tie games are not continued. Players wear the uniform of the team for which they regularly play. The designated “home team” on a given day wears its regular-season home uniforms, and the designated “visiting team” wears its regular-season road uniforms. The designated hitter rule is in place for all games. Japan’s only victory in the biennial All-Star series was in 1990. The event has proved to be a format for Japanese-born players to showcase their talent. Kazuo Matsui, who is unrelated to the Yankees’ Hideki Matsui, batted .423 with two doubles, two homers and seven RBI in the 2002 event. The switch-hitting shortstop signed with the New York Mets in 2004.

Other Notes

Cuban Omar Linares, whom many MLB scouts believe could have been a big league All-Star and perhaps Hall of Famer, ended his playing career in Japan. In 2002, Linares, a third baseman, played for Chunichi for 500,000 yen per month ($4,000 U.S). Linares is one of the greatest Cuban players of all-time who chose not to defect to play in the major leagues.Many baseball fans are trying to push Oh into the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame, even though Oh never played MLB. But neither did Josh Gibson from the Negro Leagues, and Gibson’s in the Hall. The National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown was originally established to honor those who played Major League Baseball. It has chosen to change its rules to include the world’s best players, rather than keep them ineligible due to MLB experience. Oh was the best hitter in Japanese history, but was restricted from MLB during his playing years, like Gibson. The Hall of Fame would need to change its mission and title from National to International to elect Oh.Former Chicago Cubs players have had success in Japan: George “Granddaddy Longlegs” Altman, an outfielder with the Cubs in the 1950s and 1960s hit 205 career homers in Japan and won the batting title from 1968-1975. He was so nicknamed because he was approaching 40 years old in his Japanese prime and because of his 6-foot, 4-inch frame. Leon Lee, the father of current Cub Derrek Lee, averaged 27 homers and 88 RBI during a 10-year Japanese career. Tuffy Rhodes hit three home runs on Opening Day 1994 for the Cubs and is one Japan’s all-time home run hitters.The Cubs along with the Mets were the first big league club to play a regular season game in Japan — to open the 2000 seasonThe rookie who pushes Tom Selleck’s character off the Yankees’ roster in the movie “Mr. Baseball” was played by Toronto Blue Jays’ DH Frank Thomas. Sadaharu Oh managed Japan to the 2006 WBC Championship.

Mr Baseball

For a nice insider’s look at Japanese Baseball from a foreign Baseball Player’s perspective (aside from renting the Tom Selleck classic, Mr. Baseball) head on over to CJ Nitkowski’s blog at http://www.cjbaseball.com/

Source: mopupduty.com/index.php/japanese-baseball/

 

 

 

 

 

JAPANESE BASEBALL:  BETTING LINES

 

 

 

Daily Poker Tournaments at Bodog Poker
Bodog Poker is proud to offer daily poker tournaments including guaranteed pots of $100,000 regardless of how many players compete!

 

 

Freerolls & Tournaments at BetUS.com
BetUS.com hosts daily freerolls for new depositors and daily guaranteed tournaments, Sit & Go tournaments and much more at BetUS Poker Room.

 

JAPANESE BASEBALL:  SPECIAL ARTICLES

 

[feed url=http://feedproxy.google.com/japantimes_sports]

 

 

THE LATEST CONTEST WINS & THE GROWING #1-TITLES!

 

CONTEST-WATCH - OUR LATEST #1-FINISH IN A DOCUMENTED HANDICAPPING CONTEST:

 

 

We are the ONLY sports service in the history of ther world to finish with over 70% winners in BOTH college football (73.47%) and the NFL (70.7%) in the same year.  

 

We have 321 #1 catgory finishes in documented sports service national handicapping contests - more than anyone has ever had.

 

WE FINISHED #1 IN THE 2013 MLB BASEBALL POST-SEASON CHAMPIONSHIP AT THE SPORTS EYE IN MOST NET PROFIT WON.

 

* WE FINISHED #1 IN THE 2012 NFL FOOTBALL REGULAR-SEASON CHAMPIONSHIP AT BOTH THE SPORTS MONITOR  & THE SPORTS EYE IN MOST NET PROFIT WON AND WE WON 70.8%.

 

* WE FINISHED #1 IN THE 2012 COLLEGE FOOTBALL REGULAR-SEASON CHAMPIONSHIP AT BOTH THE SPORTS MONITOR & THE SPORTS EYE IN MULTIPLE CATEGORIES, WITH 73.47%:

       #1 IN WIN PERCENTAGE (73.47%); #1 IN RETURN-ON-RISK WITH 43.14%; #1 IN MOST NET PROFIT WON; #1 IN TOTALS WITH AN AMAZING 24-4 RECORD, ETC.

 

* WE FINISHED #1 IN THE ULTIMATE CONTEST THERE IS FOR SPORTS SERVICES: THE 2012 COMBINED FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP AT THE SPORTS MONITOR, WITH A REMARKABLE

      9+% WIN OVER THE 2ND-PLACE SERVICE (AND THERE WERE 125 SERVICES IN THIS CONTEST!).  WE HAVE A COMBO WIN % OF ABOUT 72%.  IN 27 YEARS OF TSM, NO SERVICE

     HAD EVER WON THIS CONTEST BY MORE THAN 4%.  aND OVER THE LAST DECADE THE AVERAGE WIN WAS BY 0.9%.  AND WE WON BY 9+%.

 

* WE ALSO BECAME THE VERY FIRST SERVICE EVER IN THE 27 YEARS OF THE SPORTS MONITOR (TSM) TO FINISH WITH OVER 70% IN THE SAME YEAR IN BOTH COLLEGE FOOTBALL (73.47%)

 

     AND NFL FOOTBALL (70.8%).  iN SPITE OF THE LYING THIEVES WHO CLAIM TO WIN 80% ALL THE TIME (AND ARE NEVER MONITORED IN A LEGITIMATE CONTEST), NO ONE HAD EVER DONE THIS.

 

We win the 2011 NFL-Ex Football Contest @ The Sports Monitor in 2 divisions: Most Bankroll Won, Totals & Most Net Winners, Totals.

 

We win BOTH the 2011 NHL Hockey Contest @ The Sports Monitor & the Titanium Award (our 14th) @ The Sports Eye.   See our Award Notifications  HERE.

 

We win the 2011 NFL Football Contest (Post-Season) Titanium Award (our 13th) @ The Sports Eye.   See our Award Notification  HERE.

 

We win the 2010 College Football Contest (Regular-Season-totals division) @ LVSM.   See our Award Notification  HERE.

 

We win the 2010 NFL-Ex Football Contest @ LVSM - back-to-back.   See our Award Notification  HERE.

 

We win several more Handicapper-of-the-Week Awards at the Las Vegas Sports Monitor.  We have 40 of these.  See our Award Certificates  HERE.

 

We win the 2009-10 NBA Basketball Post-Season Titanium Award (our 12th) at The Sports Eye.   See our Award Notification  HERE.

 

We win the 2009-10 NBA Basketball Post-Season Contest - in every possible category - at LVSM. 

 

We win 10 more Handicapper-of-the-Week Awards - all in a row - at the Las Vegas Sports Monitor.  We have 33 of these.  See our Award Certificates  HERE.

 

We win May 2010, April 2010 & March 2010 Handicapper-of-the-Month Awards at the Las Vegas Sports Monitor.   See our Award Certificates  HERE.

 

We win the 2009-10 NBA Basketball Regular-Season (Top Win-%) at LVSM.   

 

We win the 2009-10 College Basketball Post-Season Titanium Award (our 11th) at The Sports Eye.   See our Award Notification  HERE.

 

We win the 2009-10 College Basketball Post-Season Handicapping Championship at the Las Vegas Sports Monitor.   See our Award Certificate  HERE.

 

We win the 2009-10 College Basketball Regular-Season Handicapping Championship at the Las Vegas Sports Monitor.   See our Award Certificate  HERE.

 

We win the 2009 College Football Regular-Season Handicapping Championship at the Las Vegas Sports Monitor.  See our Award Certificate  HERE.

 

 

We win the 2009 NFL Pre-Season Handicapping Championship at the Las Vegas Sports Monitor.  See our Award Certificate  HERE.

 

We finish #1 in the NBA Playoffs Championship Contest at the Las Vegas Sports Monitor (category: Best Win-%, All Sides)

 

We finish #1 in the 2009 NHL Playoffs Championship Contest at The Sports Monitor (category: Best Win-% (minimum 10 plays), Best Bets)

 

We finish #1 in the 2009 NHL Regular-Season Championship Contest at The Sports Monitor (category: Best Win-%, All Sides)

 

We finish #1 in the 2009 NBA Regular-Season Championship Contest at the Las Vegas Sports Monitor (category: Best Win-%, All Sides)

 

We win the 2009 NFL Post-Season Handicapping Championship at the Las Vegas Sports Monitor.  See our Award Certificate  HERE.

 

 

321:      WE HAVE THIS MANY #1-CATEGORY FINISHES IN DOCUMENTED HANDICAPPING CONTESTS

 

 

106

 

FOOTBALL WE HAVE THIS MANY #1-FINISHES IN THIS SPORT

72

 

BASKETBALL WE HAVE THIS MANY #1-FINISHES IN THIS SPORT

42

 

BASEBALL WE HAVE THIS MANY #1-FINISHES IN THIS SPORT

39

 

HOCKEY WE HAVE THIS MANY #1-FINISHES IN THIS SPORT

 9

 

SOCCER WE HAVE THIS MANY #1-FINISHES IN THIS SPORT

45

 

SPECIAL AWARDS
WE HAVE THIS MANY #1-FINISHES IN THESE

 

 

 

 

 

 

BASEBALL PACKAGES: NAME & ITEM CODE PRICE DESCRIPTION  

FULL-SEASON, MLB, ALL PLAYS

(BAS-MLB-ALL-FULL SEA)

 

RANKED #1 IN MLB FOR 2019 SEASON IN 2 NATIONAL HANDICAPPING CONTESTS.

 

WE WIN #1 IN NHL FOR THE SEASON AT RUTH GLASGOW'S THE SPORTS MONITOR & VEGAS SPORTS WATCH MONITOR.

 

 

RIGHT NOW RANKED #2 IN NBA FOR THE SEASON AT RUTH GLASGOW'S THE SPORTS MONITOR.

 

WE BEAT OUT 130 SERVICES IN THE LAS VEGAS SPORTS WATCH MONITOR OVERALL MLB CONTEST

RANKED # IN ALL PLAYS, MOST NET PROFIT, FOR THE ENTIRE YEAR AT SPORTSWATCH MONITOR, BEATING OUT 200 SPORTS SERVICES

 

You will get your plays by an emailed report -

or you can call us

$1295

(ALL SIDES & TOTALS)

Includes every play through the World Series.

#1 IN THE WORLD FOR THE ENTIRE YEAR OVER 201 HANDICAPPERS AT THE SPORTS WATCH.  

AND WE'VE FINISHED #1 IN 48 NATIONAL HANDICAPPING MLB CONTEST CATEGORIES - MORE THAN ANYONE ELSE...EVER.

INCLUDES ALL PLAYS!

Daily cost = just $7+/day

SAVE $2374 off the weekly rate for the whole season!

THE VERY BEST rate - NEW - LOWEST rate EVER!

OUR MOST POPULAR MLB PACKAGE!

This is top-selling package, year- after -year, next to our combined college & NFL package.

Sports Betting at the Sportsbook

 

BASEBALL PACKAGES: NAME & ITEM CODE PRICE DESCRIPTION  

THE PLAY-OF-THE-DAY, MLB, FULL SEASON

(BAS-MLB-POD-FULL SEA)

 

RIGHT NOW RANKED #1 IN MLB FOR THE SEASON AT RUTH GLASGOW'S THE SPORTS MONITOR.

 

RIGHT NOW RANKED #1 IN NHL FOR THE SEASON AT RUTH GLASGOW'S THE SPORTS MONITOR.

 

 

RIGHT NOW RANKED #2 IN NBA FOR THE SEASON AT RUTH GLASGOW'S THE SPORTS MONITOR.

 

WE BEAT OUT 130 SERVICES IN THE LAS VEGAS MLB CONTEST

RANKED # IN ALL PLAYS, MOST NET PROFIT, FOR THE ENTIRE YEAR AT SPORTSWATCH MONITOR, BEATING OUT 200 SPORTS SERVICES

 

You will get your plays by an emailed report -

or you can call us

#1 IN THE WORLD OVER 193 HANDICAPPERS AT THE SPORTS WATCH

$1095

(PLAYS OF THE DAY MAY BE MONEY-LINE SIDES OR TOTALS)

Includes every Play-of-the-Day through the World Series.

WE'VE FINISHED #1 IN 48 NATIONAL HANDICAPPING MLB CONTEST CATEGORIES - MORE THAN ANYONE ELSE...EVER.

ON TOP OF 201 HANDICAPPERS AT THE SPORTS WATCH.

INCLUDES ALL PLAYS-OF-THE-DAY!


Daily cost = just $4+/day

SAVE $2735 off the daily rate for the 30- week full-season!

THE VERY BEST rate - NEW - LOWEST rate EVER!

OUR MOST POPULAR MLB SPOT-PLAY PACKAGE!

This is top-selling package, year- after -year, next to our combined college & NFL package.

 
Bet on MLB at BetOnline
 

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